Missing Children Publication Hub

The publications in this section contain the results of our research as well as curated research on topics and issues relevant to missing children in Europe and the world. Example of the type of research you can find are understanding the causes of the different types of missing children cases in Europe, policy on missing children, search and rescue operations and family support. The menu and submenu options below will help you find what you're looking for.

If you'd like to share relevant research with us, please send the title, a link and description of the research to info@missingchildreneurope.eu.

Search Results
3 item(s).
  • Missing : Persons and Politics
    Jennifer Ann Edkins
    In Missing, Jenny Edkins highlights stories from a range of circumstances that shed light on this critical tension: the aftermath of World War II, when millions in Europe were displaced; the period following the fall of the World Trade Center towers in Manhattan in 2001 and the bombings in London in 2005; searches for military personnel missing in action; the thousands of political "disappearances" in Latin America; and in more quotidian circumstances where people walk out on their families and disappear of their own volition.
  • Healing loss, ambiguity, and trauma: a community-based intervention with families of union workers missing after the 9/11 attack in New York City
    Pauline Boss, Lorraine Beaulieu, Elizabeth Wieling, William Turner and Shulaika LaCruz
    A team of therapists from Minnesota and New York workied with labor union families of workers gone missing on September 11, 2001, after the attack on the World Trade Center.
  • Communication, Liminality, and Hope: The September 11th Missing Person Posters
    Kevin T. Jones, Kenneth S. Zagacki, Todd V. Lewis
    In this paper, we argue that the posters represent a powerful response to a traumatic and in some ways unprecedented situation (September 11, 2001), a response that transformed the death of loved ones from a reality or future certainty into a probability made possible by the searchers' desire, emotions, or imagination.