Missing Children Publication Hub

The publications in this section contain the results of our research as well as curated research on topics and issues relevant to missing children in Europe and the world. Example of the type of research you can find are understanding the causes of the different types of missing children cases in Europe, policy on missing children, search and rescue operations and family support. The menu and submenu options below will help you find what you're looking for.

If you'd like to share relevant research with us, please send the title, a link and description of the research to info@missingchildreneurope.eu.

Search Results
3 item(s).
  • The effectiveness of supermarket posters in helping to find missing children
    Lampinen, J. M., Arnal, J., & Hicks, J. L.
    The research addresses the question of how effective Supermarket Posters are in Helping to Find Missing Children
  • Once missing - Never forgotten?
    Mette Drivsholm, Delphine Moralis, Dr. Karen Shalev-Greene, Dr. Penny Woolnough
    To date, few attempts have been made to evaluate the effectiveness of publicity campaigns, all of which were carried out in the USA. While scarce, the research tends to reveal disappointing results and suggest that publicity appeals don’t necessarily positively impact the investigation or search. The dissemination of images of missing children furthermore raises potential issues regarding the impact that it may have on the protection of the child’s privacy and overall wellbeing. Others however argue that appeals can help to gather vital information from the public and safeguard children at risk, with Child Alert systems in particular having been credited for safeguarding missing children (OJJPD, 2016). These views call for further research to ensure the effectiveness of publicity appeals in their potential of saving lives, while limiting the negative impact for missing children and their families.
  • Communication, Liminality, and Hope: The September 11th Missing Person Posters
    Kevin T. Jones, Kenneth S. Zagacki, Todd V. Lewis
    In this paper, we argue that the posters represent a powerful response to a traumatic and in some ways unprecedented situation (September 11, 2001), a response that transformed the death of loved ones from a reality or future certainty into a probability made possible by the searchers' desire, emotions, or imagination.