Missing Children Publication Hub

The publications in this section contain the results of our research as well as curated research on topics and issues relevant to missing children in Europe and the world. Example of the type of research you can find are understanding the causes of the different types of missing children cases in Europe, policy on missing children, search and rescue operations and family support. The menu and submenu options below will help you find what you're looking for.

If you'd like to share relevant research with us, please send the title, a link and description of the research to info@missingchildreneurope.eu.

Search Results
7 item(s).
  • Ambiguous Loss in a Non-Western Context: Families of the Disappeared in Postconflict Nepal
    Simon Robins
    Ambiguous loss is explored in a different cultural context through a study of the families of persons disappeared during Nepal's decade-long Maoist insurgency.
  • Ambiguous loss: a complicated type of grief when loved ones disappear
    Pauline Boss, Janet R Yeats
    Ambiguous loss is an unclear loss that continues without resolution or closure. The authors present six guidelines about meaning, mastery, identity, ambivalence, attachment, and hope.
  • Loss, Trauma and Resilience : Therapeutic Work with Ambiguous Loss
    Pauline Boss
    Pauline Boss, the principal theorist of the concept of ambiguous loss, guides clinicians in the task of building resilience in clients who face the trauma of loss without resolution. Boss describes a concrete therapeutic approach that is at once directive and open to the complex contexts in which people find meaning and discover hope in the face of ambiguous losses
  • Lessons from Australia: Developing a new counselling service for families when someone is missing
    Helen Morell
    This report describes Helen's trip and the lessons she learned.
  • The Trauma and Complicated Grief of Ambiguous Loss
    Pauline Boss
    Ambiguous loss is a newly identified type of loss that occurs when a loved one is physically present, but psychologically absent. Dementia is just one example.
  • Supporting those who are left behind A counselling framework to support families of missing persons
    Sarah wayland
    Each year in Australia, 35,000 people are reported missing to police. For every missing person’s case reported, at least 12 people are affected whether it is emotionally, psychologically, physically or financially. That means that a significantly large number of people will endure the trauma associated with the unresolved loss of a loved one.
  • Holding on to hope: A review of the literature exploring missing persons, hope and ambiguous loss
    Sarah Waylanda, Myfanwy Maplea, Kathy McKaya & Geoffrey Glassocka
    This review explores hope for families of missing people.