Missing Children Publication Hub

The publications in this section contain the results of our research as well as curated research on topics and issues relevant to missing children in Europe and the world. Example of the type of research you can find are understanding the causes of the different types of missing children cases in Europe, policy on missing children, search and rescue operations and family support. The menu and submenu options below will help you find what you're looking for.

If you'd like to share relevant research with us, please send the title, a link and description of the research to info@missingchildreneurope.eu.

Family Support
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  • ‘We look at it through a different lens’ How a shared hope between the left behind and those who investigate can enhance the wellbeing of families of missing people.
    "Sarah Wayland, Dr Kathy McKay, Dr Geoffrey Glassock "
    Families interviewed for the purposes of an Australian based narrative inquiry study exploring hope and ambiguous loss referred to the police as both “hope enablers” and “hope detractors” in their response to loss.
  • “It’s the hope that hurts” Best practice in counselling models relevant to families and friends of missing persons
    Hunter Institute of Mental Health
    In early June of 2001 the families and friends of Missing persons unit operating within the NSW attorney General’s department out of the victims of Crime Bureau contracted the hunter institute of Mental health to investigate and report on best practice model/s relevant to families and friends of missing persons.
  • A cognitive behavioral intervention for emotional distress among loved ones of missing persons
    Prof. Dr. Jos de Keijser, Lonneke Lenferink, Prof. Dr. Paul Boelen
    In the current study, we examined to what extent these interventions can be useful in the treatment of persistent distress among loved ones of missing persons.
  • Ambiguous Loss and Its Effects on Children: Implications and Interventions for School Counselors
    K Guidry, C. Simpson, T Test, C Bloomfield
    The purpose of this article is to define and describe the concept of grief and how it may explain challenging behaviors with students. Additionally, this definition will be expanded by introducing the definition of ambiguous grief.
  • Ambiguous Loss in a Non-Western Context: Families of the Disappeared in Postconflict Nepal
    Simon Robins
    Ambiguous loss is explored in a different cultural context through a study of the families of persons disappeared during Nepal's decade-long Maoist insurgency.
  • Ambiguous loss: a complicated type of grief when loved ones disappear
    Pauline Boss, Janet R Yeats
    Ambiguous loss is an unclear loss that continues without resolution or closure. The authors present six guidelines about meaning, mastery, identity, ambivalence, attachment, and hope.
  • An Uncertain Hope: Missing People’s overview of the theory, research and learning about how it feels for families when a loved one goes missing
    Missing People
    This guidance provides an overview of the currently available research, policy, knowledge and understanding about what it is really like to cope when someone you love is missing.
  • Families living with absence: Searching for missing people
    Hester Parr and Olivia Stevenson
    The report raises many relevant issues for working with families of missing people, but also highlights the need for families to have time and space to remember.
  • Family Feedback Survey Report
    Missing People's annual Impact Report shows how we are meeting the needs of missing children, missing adults and their families across the UK.
  • Healing loss, ambiguity, and trauma: a community-based intervention with families of union workers missing after the 9/11 attack in New York City
    Pauline Boss, Lorraine Beaulieu, Elizabeth Wieling, William Turner and Shulaika LaCruz
    A team of therapists from Minnesota and New York workied with labor union families of workers gone missing on September 11, 2001, after the attack on the World Trade Center.
  • Holding on to hope: A review of the literature exploring missing persons, hope and ambiguous loss
    Sarah Waylanda, Myfanwy Maplea, Kathy McKaya & Geoffrey Glassocka
    This review explores hope for families of missing people.
  • Informing, including and supporting young people when a loved one is missing
    Liz Davies
    Young people are often the forgotten ‘victims’ in the presence of trauma. When a loved one is missing, young people may be the silent onlookers who are quickly whisked out of sight. Their questions may remain unanswered, in an attempt to avoid distress, to protect their ‘innocence’, or out of impotence to find the right words or explanation; but at what cost to the ongoing emotional well-being of the young person?
  • Lessons from Australia: Developing a new counselling service for families when someone is missing
    Helen Morell
    This report describes Helen's trip and the lessons she learned.
  • Life’s on Hold: Missing people, private calendars and waiting
    Susan Hogben
    This article presents the impact of someone being missing, by considering the role of time in three interrelated fashions.
  • Living in Limbo: The experiences of, and impacts on, the families of missing people
    Lucy Holmes
    This small scale, exploratory study aimed to provide a rich and deep account of the ways in which a disappearance can affect a missing person’s family members.
  • Loss, Trauma and Resilience : Therapeutic Work with Ambiguous Loss
    Pauline Boss
    Pauline Boss, the principal theorist of the concept of ambiguous loss, guides clinicians in the task of building resilience in clients who face the trauma of loss without resolution. Boss describes a concrete therapeutic approach that is at once directive and open to the complex contexts in which people find meaning and discover hope in the face of ambiguous losses
  • Missing News
    Anon
    Read about the Guardianship consultation and other latest developments relating to missing
  • Missing siblings: seeking more adequate social responses
    Julie Clark, Jeni Warburton, Cheryl Tilse
    This paper links knowledge of siblings, loss and grief to an understanding of this phenomenon. It presents the methodology and findings of an exploratory, qualitive study into the expériences of nine adult siblings of long-term missing people in Australia and presents the themes drawn from their account.
  • Supporting those who are left behind A counselling framework to support families of missing persons
    Sarah wayland
    Each year in Australia, 35,000 people are reported missing to police. For every missing person’s case reported, at least 12 people are affected whether it is emotionally, psychologically, physically or financially. That means that a significantly large number of people will endure the trauma associated with the unresolved loss of a loved one.
  • The impact of missing a loved one: A systematic review of quantitative and qualitative research
    "Lonneke Lenferink, Prof. Dr. Jos de Keijser, Prof. Dr. Paul Boelen, Dr. Ineke Wessel, Doety de Vries "
    Is it possible to create a theoretical framework for those who are missing a loved one on the basis of the loss-related frameworks? And what are the clinical consequences for this framework?
  • The Kosovo Family Support Project: Offering Psychosocial Support for Families with Missing Persons
    Mary Ellen Keough, Margaret F. Samuels
    This article presents a case that illustrates the vital role that social workers and other mental health and public health workers provided to support families following the 1999 conflict between Serb forces and Kosovar Albanians in Kosovo.
  • The Missing Link in Resilience Research
    Shaul Kimhi, Yohanan Eshel
    This article is a most comprehensive and important review of resilience research which presents an intellectual challenge to every scholar in this field.
  • The Trauma and Complicated Grief of Ambiguous Loss
    Pauline Boss
    Ambiguous loss is a newly identified type of loss that occurs when a loved one is physically present, but psychologically absent. Dementia is just one example.
  • Traumatic Loss in Children and Adolescents
    Anthony P. Mannarino , Judith A. Cohen
    This article discusses the distinctive features of CTG, how it is different from normal bereavement, how this condition is assessed, and promising treatments for children who experience a traumatic loss.
  • Unresolved Loss: Issues in Working with Adults Whose Siblings were Kidnapped Years Ago
    Geoffrey Greif, Duane T. Bowers
    This article describes the common issues raised by five adults (18-60 years old) whose siblings were kidnapped during their childhood or in early adulthood.
  • What about me? Coping with the abduction of a brother or sister
    US Department of Justice
    This publication is the effort of those who have lived the nightmare of losing a sister or brother. Eight siblings joined with the Office of Justice Programs to write this guide.
  • When hope and grief intersect: Rates and risks of prolonged grief disorder among bereaved individuals and relatives of disappeared persons in Colombia
    Carina Heeke, Nadine Stammel, Christine Knaevelsrud
    This study investigates prolonged grief disorder and its risk factors in a sample of persons who lost a significant other to disappearance as compared with a sample of bereaved individuals, both groups having experienced displacement due to the armed conflict in Colombia.
  • When the Search is Over: Reconnecting missing children and adults
    Lucy Holmes
    This project explored the ways in which missing people reconnect to family, carers or a place of safety, and makes recommendations for improvements in the way reconnections are facilitated and supported.
  • 'You are going to drop the ball on this ...': using siblings' stories to inform better interprofessional practice when someone goes missing
    Julie Clark
    The need for support from human services workers to complement the role of police is recognised as is the important role of non-government support and advocacy services.