Missing Children Publication Hub

The publications in this section contain the results of our research as well as curated research on topics and issues relevant to missing children in Europe and the world. Example of the type of research you can find are understanding the causes of the different types of missing children cases in Europe, policy on missing children, search and rescue operations and family support. The menu and submenu options below will help you find what you're looking for.

If you'd like to share relevant research with us, please send the title, a link and description of the research to info@missingchildreneurope.eu.

The blue light social services? Responding to repeat reports to the police of people missing from institutional locations (by Carol Hayden & Karen Shalev-Greene)



Missing Children Publication Hub

Missing children

Views 4249 times


The issues that arise in responding to repeat reports to the policing of people missing from institutional locations (such as hospitals, mental health units and children's residential care) are the focus of this article. This focus relates to the broader issue of policing vulnerability and the concepts of ‘duty of care’, ‘safeguarding’ and ‘risk’ as they apply to role of the police in their response to missing people. The current study is based on research on 1321 missing persons cases that were closed in 2011; these cases came from 149 institutional locations in a police force in central England and account for nearly half of all repeat reports to the police in this force area. The top ten organisational addresses accounted for over a quarter (27.6%, 364 of 1321) of the repeat reports over a one-year period. Seven of these organisational addresses are private children's care homes (275 reports, 75.5% of the top 10 reporting locations) and three are mental health units (89 reports, 24.5% of the top 10 reporting locations). The cost to the police of responding to reports from these 10 locations is estimated to be between £482,250 and £879,060. The article highlights that a significant part of police work on missing people relates to institutional locations that present the police with different types of potential risk.



SIMILAR
  • Missing Persons A handbook of research
    Missing Persons A handbook of research by Karen Shalev Greene and Llian Alys
    This groundbreaking book brings together for the first time ideas and expertise across this vast subject area into one interconnected publication. It explores the subjects of missing children, missing adults, the investigative process of missing person cases, and the families of missing persons.
  • The cultural nature of missing
    The cultural nature of missing by Joe Apps
    The notions of trying to define 'missing' and 'missingness' are fascinating. Many people, who are reported to authorities as being missing by family and friends, do not consider themselves as missing persons; when found, they are surprised that they have been considered as 'missing'. Adults have rights to do as they please and also the right to be forgotten.
  • Life’s on Hold: Missing people, private calendars and waiting
    Life’s on Hold: Missing people, private calendars and waiting by Susan Hogben
    This article presents the impact of someone being missing, by considering the role of time in three interrelated fashions.
  • Living in Limbo: The experiences of, and impacts on, the families of missing people
    Living in Limbo: The experiences of, and impacts on, the families of missing people by Lucy Holmes
    This small scale, exploratory study aimed to provide a rich and deep account of the ways in which a disappearance can affect a missing person’s family members.
  • 'You are going to drop the ball on this ...': using siblings' stories to inform better interprofessional practice when someone goes missing
    'You are going to drop the ball on this ...': using siblings' stories to inform better interprofessional practice when someone goes missing by Julie Clark
    The need for support from human services workers to complement the role of police is recognised as is the important role of non-government support and advocacy services.
  • The search for missing persons- The Belgian approach
    The search for missing persons- The Belgian approach by Alain Remue
  • Strategic Threat Assessment on Child Trafficking in the UK
    Strategic Threat Assessment on Child Trafficking in the UK by Anon
    Report providing an assessment of national strategic trends, informs police, UKBA, children's services, NGOs. Aids prevention and prosecution of those exploiting children. Recommends partnerships between agencies and best practice.
  • Protection of children and vulnerable adults: police disclosure of damaging allegations
    Protection of children and vulnerable adults: police disclosure of damaging allegations by Bennion, F. A
    Explores the nature and methods of abuse in child trafficking. It also explores the protection and treatment offered to these vulnerable children.
  • Missing persons in Australia
    Missing persons in Australia by Marianne James, Jessica Anderson and Judy Putt
    This paper identifies key priorities for further development to improve practices related to reducing the incidence of missing persons and the provision of services.
  • Breaking the cycle: Collaborating and behaving differently to improve the outcomes and experiences of missing children
    Breaking the cycle: Collaborating and behaving differently to improve the outcomes and experiences of missing children by Kerry Wade
    The purpose of this paper is to explore how, by encouraging all key stakeholders to “play nicely and act maturely” to share responsibility, the author was able to improve outcomes for children reported missing to Gwent Police.
  • Police Search Advisers (PolSAs) and the search for missing people
    Police Search Advisers (PolSAs) and the search for missing people by Lucy Holmes and Penny Woolnough
    This research explores: the nature and extent to which PolSAs are involved in missing person cases; the nature of the relationship between PolSAs and SIOs; multiagency working (including other search agencies); the potential personal pressures PolSAs face and strategies to mitigate against these; procedural / process / organisational related aspects of the PolSA role including opportunities for improvement; PolSA training; and encounters and familiarity with families of missing persons.
  • Examining Missing Person Police Reports to Identify the Service Needs of Runaway Youth and Their Families
    Examining Missing Person Police Reports to Identify the Service Needs of Runaway Youth and Their Families by George Patterson
    Examined situational and demographic characteristics in a sample of 47 children missing person police reports.



REVIEWS

 No reviews have been added yet, be the first to add a review!